Tag Archives: NSTIC NPO

Many thanks for a successful 800-63-3 public preview!

As summer has flown by, you have kept us very busy reviewing your comments on GitHub to Special Publication (SP) 800-63-3 and engaged in a dialog about how this material can be enhanced to better support the public and private sectors. The response we’ve received to SP 800-63-3 – and this new approach – has been phenomenal and inspiring. And now, we’re excited to transition from the public preview period for draft NIST SP 800-63-3: Digital Authentication Guideline to the next critical phase – the 60-day public comment period. But before we do that, I’d like to explain what we learned this summer and where we are headed next… Continue reading

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Citius, Altius, Fortius: Announcing 6 new pilot projects across 10 states (and D.C.!)

As the sun was setting on the thirtieth modern Olympiad in London, NIST was preparing to announce our very first set of NSTIC pilot projects. As the flame goes out in Rio, we’re setting new records. In our largest pilot announcement to date, today NIST is proud to add six new projects to our ranks and bring the total number of projects to 24. Continue reading

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Questions…and buzz surrounding draft NIST Special Publication 800-63-3

Here’s the backstory: You may have noticed that we’ve been getting a wee bit of attention on the proposed deprecation of SMS as an out-of-band second authentication factor in section 5.1.3.2 of draft NIST Special Publication 800-63-3: Digital Authentication Guideline. First, we’re happy to get the attention. Sure, this is a NIST document, but the point of public comment—and our extended public preview of the draft on GitHub—is to make sure the community is a part of creating it. The more eyes the better. The team here at NIST wouldn’t quite say many commenters make lighter work—but they sure do make a better end product. Continue reading

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Calling all 800-63-3 comments!

Have you done your summer reading yet? We’re approaching this summer’s halfway point – which means we’re halfway through the public preview of draft NIST Special Publication 800-63-3: Digital Authentication Guideline. Don’t let the dog days of summer get you down – we still need your feedback and expert opinions! For a refresher on some of the major changes to 800-63-3 and why we’re using GitHub to solicit comments, see our announcement blog. Continue reading

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Coffee Chat with Michael Kaiser, Executive Director, National Cyber Security Alliance

To get to the core of multi-factor authentication (MFA) and why it’s such an important security feature, we caught up with Michael Kaiser, the Executive Director of the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA). Mr. Kaiser graciously sat down with us for our inaugural coffee chat – a new series on the NSTIC Notes Blog. In this series, we’ll hear from various leaders in the identity community as they share unique perspectives—in their own words—on essential identity topics. See our questions and his answers, below. Continue reading

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The IDEF Registry: an open invite to commit to trusted digital identity solutions

This morning at the Cloud Identity Summit in New Orleans, the IDESG announced the implementation of the IDEF Registry, an online listing service where ecosystem participants can report their self-assessed status against the IDEF baseline requirements. By attesting to these requirements on the Registry, organizations can showcase their commitment to providing trusted digital identity services. It’s a great way for organizations to demonstrate that they have crossed a threshold in the marketplace, addressing mature protections for consumers beyond those minimally required by law. Continue reading

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Announcing Draft Special Publication 800-63-3: Digital Authentication Guideline!

Today, we’re releasing the public preview of draft Special Publication 800-63-3, Digital Authentication Guideline. We’re excited to share the updates we’ve made—along with the new process that enables our stakeholders to more contribute to the document in a more dynamic way. Continue reading

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WHOA-OH! WE’RE HALFWAY THERE! Happy NSTICiversary!

It’s a little hard to believe, but today marks the 5th anniversary of the NSTIC, the strategy for achieving trusted digital identities in a private sector-led identity ecosystem. Let’s take a glimpse back in time to where we were five years ago:

It’s 2011. Most (79%) American adults use the Internet. The average user needs 10 different passwords for their daily online activity, according to a UK study, and 3 out of 4 Americans don’t use sufficiently strong passwords for their most sensitive accounts. It’s also a year of unprecedented data breaches. In fact, “2011 boasts the second-highest data loss since [Verizon] started keeping track in 2004,” with 855 incidents and 174 million compromised records. Some companies are getting more aggressive in pursuing better security; 2011 is the year Google released two-factor authentication (2FA). While companies are beginning to adopt more secure solutions, they’re still uncommon, even in services with the most sensitive data: in 2011, only 35% of non-Federal short-term care hospitals have the capability for 2FA. Continue reading

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A previously unknown vulnerability.

This has gone on long enough. In 2004, Bill Gates predicted the demise of the password: “There is no doubt that over time, people are going to rely less and less on passwords. People use the same password on different systems, they write them down and they just don’t meet the challenge for anything you really want to secure.”

The first known computer password heist occurred 54 years ago and the situation is arguably worse than it was in 1962. The 2015 Verizon Data Breach Report estimated 700 million compromised records in 2014 with a $400 million estimated financial impact. According to Verizon’s Data Breach Digest, 80% of breaches involve exploitation of stolen, weak, default, or easily guessable passwords. Continue reading

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